ESPN Narrative About Sandusky Scandal


STATE COLLEGE, PA. — In the lobby of the Penn Stater hotel, they stood vigil — reporters, cameramen, students, alumni, residents and a few tipsy hotel bar patrons. It was Nov. 9, 2011, shortly before 9 p.m., and the throng awaited the decision of the Pennsylvania State University board of trustees. Behind the closed doors of Room 206, the 32 men and women charged with navigating the worst crisis in Penn State’s 156-year history were on the verge of a painstaking but seemingly unavoidable verdict.

Near the back of a conference room littered with coffee cups and plates of half-eaten fudge brownies and chocolate-chip cookies, a 79-year-old trustee and philanthropist named Mimi Coppersmith stood up and beseeched her colleagues to reconsider what they were poised to do. “Coach Paterno is revered here in State College,” she said.

“We’re not going to drink the Kool-Aid,” snapped John P. Surma, then the board’s vice chairman and the chief executive officer of United States Steel Corp. “This is what we need to do.”

From the speaker of a nearby telephone, a distinctive voice chimed in: “Remember the children. Remember that little boy in the shower.” The voice belonged to Thomas W. Corbett Jr., the governor of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania and a member of the board of trustees. Corbett was participating in his first meeting, but he had the last word.

Surma then asked whether any trustee objected to the firing of coach Joe Paterno.

The question was met with silence.

Accounting of events of November 2011 and the firing of Joe Paterno

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s